100 CALORIE PACK ALMONDS

100 Calorie Pack Almonds - 500 Calorie Diet Recipes - Low Glycemic Carbs List.

INSULIN RESISTANCE AND WEIGHT LOSS. INSULIN RESISTANCE AND


Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss. Low Carb Pizza Recipes



Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss





insulin resistance and weight loss














insulin resistance and weight loss - Freedom from




Freedom from PCOS: 3 Proven Steps to Naturally Overcome Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Insulin Resistance


Freedom from PCOS: 3 Proven Steps to Naturally Overcome Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Insulin Resistance



Freedom from PCOS is a message of hope for women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and insulin resistance. Katie Humphrey shares her personal journey with both conditions, providing women with a proven, three step approach to restore health naturally.

Freedom from PCOS is a message of hope for women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and insulin resistance. Katie Humphrey shares her personal journey with both conditions, providing women with a proven, three step approach to restore health naturally.










83% (14)





D365: Day 24




D365: Day 24





Friday, April 15, 2011

I like the Times. I do. But the paper lets me down sometimes, like when a March 8 article opened with this sentence: "Every morning, Kay Brown engages in a ritual similar to a heroin addict’s, or a diabetic’s: she sticks herself with a syringe. Only hers contains hCG, a pregnancy hormone." This was alarmingly tasteless.

Today I read the 9-page "Is Sugar Toxic?" article, and I took notes. Surprisingly, "diabetes" did not appear until the top of page 3. But it was introduced with a doozy: readers are told that obesity and diabetes are so "intimately linked that some authorities have taken to calling them 'diabesity.'" From that point on, it's pretty much all diabetes, all the time.

Type 1 is not mentioned in the whole article, and in all nine pages, Type 2 is only mentioned three times, once on the bottom of page 4, and then twice on page 8. Instead, "diabetes" and "insulin resistance" are used over and over.

The author is responding to reader questions and comments for the next few days. I scrolled through them frantically until I found the comments I hoped were there, although the answers only frustrated me more:

Comment 71
You often refer to type 2 diabetes as "diabetes" or are you implying that all kinds of diabetes may be affected by sugar/HFCS consumption?

Author answer:
I refer to type 2 diabetes as diabetes for convenience and to save myself having to repeat "type 2" again and again – and readers having to read it. Type 1 is a different problem entirely and a more severe disorder, but I'm not as sanguine as the public health authorities that it's not triggered by something like sugar/HFCS.

Comment 87
In the future, can you please be more specific when referring to diabetes and diabetics? It is not until several pages in that Type II diabetes is mentioned. Type I diabetics, who have an autoimmune disease not caused by poor dietary choices, are tired of shooting down common misconceptions about the origin of their disease. While I'm sure you're quite aware of the difference, please be more precise with your language.

Author answer:
An excellent point and I am guilty as charged. This is an inherent problem, though, in writing science for the lay public. The science invariably has to be simplified considerably to make the articles flow and to prevent readers from getting bogged down early in technical details -- the difference, in this case, between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. So the detail is delayed for later in the article, by which time, as you point out, readers could have already come to mistaken conclusions about which diabetes we're discussing. This is always a judgment call, but it's a hard problem to avoid and there are no easy solutions. Or if there are, I haven't mastered them.

I'm sorry, but "I refer to type 2 diabetes as diabetes for convenience and to save myself having to repeat "type 2" again and again"??? "The science invariably has to be simplified considerably to make the articles flow and to prevent readers from getting bogged down early in technical details -- the difference, in this case, between type 1 and type 2 diabetes"???? Are you serious? And your editors and the Times are okay with this? So very, very frustrating.











Bearded lady, except that I ain't no lady




Bearded lady, except that I ain't no lady





I've got Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), which is actually fairly common, affecting about 5 to 10 percent of women. It's strongly correlated with insulin resistance, which makes women with PCOS at high risk for becoming diabetic. Common symptoms include irregular periods, infertility, & hirsuteness -- that is, hair where women don't normally get much of it -- probably due to higher than typical levels of "male" hormones like androgen & testosterone. I was diagnosed with PCOS in 1982, when I was 23, though I'd experienced some of its symptoms as far back as my junior year in high school (1976). But, I wasn't told it had anything to do with insulin resistance until I was diagnosed as prediabetic about five years ago. I've changes my dietary & exercise habits in order to prevent myself from becoming fully diabetic.

I don't mess with my bit of mustache because my hair is very blonde & it's not that noticeable. But I usually shave my chinny-chin-chin because it's a good deal more noticeable. But I'm getting set for a Pekka photoshoot, so I've been letting it grow out a bit. For Pekka, I use dark mascara to darken my beard, mustache, & eyebrows. After I'm done with this shoot (probably this weekend), I'll shave my chin & will not do another Pekka shoot until it grows out again or I get ambitious enough to make myself up with theatrical or costume shop hair.









insulin resistance and weight loss








insulin resistance and weight loss




Syndrome X: The Complete Nutritional Program to Prevent and Reverse Insulin Resistance






You can feel great again!

"Syndrome X proactively lays out a nutritious, tasty, and simple diet plan to get us back to the basics of healthy nutrition."-Lendon H. Smith, M.D., New York Times bestselling author of Feed Your Body Right

"Syndrome X is the best new book to help you understand the facts about nutrition, health, and aging. . . . It is full of new information and insights most readers have never had access to before. Everyone who values his or her health will want to read the book and then individualize the program to suit his or her needs-the authors have made this easier than ever to do."-Richard A. Kunin, M.D., author of Mega-Nutrition

What is Syndrome X? It's a resistance to insulin-the hormone needed to burn food for energy-combined with high cholesterol or triglycerides, high blood pressure, or too much body fat. Syndrome X ages you prematurely and significantly increases your risk of heart disease, hypertension, obesity, eye disease, nervous system disorders, diabetes, Alzheimer's, cancer, and other age-related diseases.

Syndrome X is the first book to tell you how to fight the epidemic disorder that is derailing the health of nearly a third of North Americans. It outlines a complete three-step program-including easy-to-follow diets, light physical activity, and readily available vitamins and nutritional supplements-that will safeguard you against developing Syndrome X or reverse it if you already have it.

If you're aging prematurely, getting fatter, feeling sluggish, and watching your blood pressure and cholesterol sneak upwards, you may have "Syndrome X," claim the authors, who say that up to 60 million North Americans have it. "Syndrome X is primarily a nutritional disease caused by eating the wrong foods," they write. The mysterious-sounding "Syndrome X" refers to a group of health problems including insulin resistance ("the inability to properly deal with dietary carbohydrates such as sugars"), plus at least one additional problem, such as abnormal blood fats (elevated cholesterol or triglycerides), overweight, and/or high blood pressure. Insulin resistance is "a diet-caused hormonal logjam that interferes with your body's ability to efficiently burn the food you eat." According to the authors, you probably have this problem, and if you do, eating processed carbohydrates are the root of it. Pastries, pastas, breakfast cereals, soft drinks--these refined carbos are the enemy. The book warns you that you probably suffer from insulin resistance (please get a blood test instead of relying on the admittedly unscientific questionnaire in the book, which makes everyone suspect who eats cereal or drinks fruit juice). Then the authors jump on the high-protein, low carb bandwagon. You can eat three eggs for breakfast, roast duck for lunch, and salmon for dinner, and snack on chicken slices.
It seems odd that if the problem is refined carbs that the solution is high protein and low carbs. The authors admit that most unrefined, or complex, carbohydrates do not have the excessive glucose- and insulin-stimulating effect of refined carbs, so why not recommend high-quality, unrefined carbohydrates (which are preferred over high-protein diets by the American Dietetic Association)? Consumers can't tell the difference, the authors say. So rather than educate them to the difference, let them eat meat. Go figure.










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